The Gender Positive Frenchmen: Paris Men’s Fashion Week S/S 2020 Trends

by Shubhi Srivastava

01-August-2019  |  6 mins read

Paris Men’s Fashion Week S/S 2020

The Paris Men’s Fashion Week concluded the Spring/Summer 2020 runway season for the dynamic menswear space, ending on a note that has left several industry stakeholders pondering about the prospects of genderless fashion. The designers, established and new, painted a vivid picture of progressive design language that had a lot more than just a touch of womenswear fashion traits, encapsulating details and aesthetics that were once restricted to the fairer gender. Another characteristic that intersected the presentations was a move towards tailoring, as several designers opted to imbibe a little street inspiration to sophisticated luxury pieces, instead of opting for head-to-toe streetwear looks that had disrupted the menswear market a few seasons back.

Paris definitely wins the number game, owing to France’s stronghold in the industry. The € 150 billion French fashion industry boasts of having one of the biggest proportion of male shoppers, as men constitute about 41.7 per cent of the consumer groups, and thus, the country commands a significant role in dictating the trends globally for the segment. The French luxury fashion brands have the biggest share of sales globally and even houses LVMH, the luxury conglomerate that tops the chart of luxury good companies by sales, as per Deliotte’s annual luxury report.

In pink and pastels, sheer and soft, and oozing charm and chic, here is our edit of the trends that dictated the French Fashion Week Spring/Summer 2020.

Blush Rush

Blush Rush

Be it Jacquemus’ endless hot pink runway, or Dior Homme’s entire ceiling to floor blush pink setting, pink bagged the title of the colour of the season. The biggest inclination towards soft pastel versions of the colour contrasted against deeper pink hues.

Thom Browne went for classic pink and white pinstripes, Dior laid out its pink army through casual tailored pieces with vintage logo-ed newspaper prints and pastel solids, while Balmain, GMBH and Walter Van Beirendonck created a mosaic of contrasting materials and shades of pink for their layered looks.

Cut Up & Tailored

Cut Up & Tailored

Twisting conventional tailoring has been a mainstay since Fall 2018, but Parisian designers transformed the conventional suit into something that is literally tailor-made for summer by reducing lengths any way possible, as pants turned into shorts, shirts became cropped and finally, the coats were presented without any sleeves.

Rochas, Ami Alexandre Mattiussi, Berluti pulled out their version of double breasted sleeveless coats, while Balmain and Jil Sander shed sleeves off their occasionwear tuxedos. Jacquemus, Angus Chiang and Sankuanz went for coordinated shorts and blazer sets and Thom Browne gave up length completely with crotch-hugging micro shorts keeping up its sportswear theme.

Shirtless Summer

Shirtless Summer

Designers took the ‘Beat the Heat’ memo quite literally as they decided to shed the staple part of the attire, the shirts. As sharp tailoring took center stage, more focus on outerwear was evident as every presentation had its share of shirtless outfit translated to fit the brand’s signature aesthetics.

Street inspired short jackets such as bikers and bombers or drawstring windbreakers without any cover beneath were chosen by Angus Chiang, Ami Alexandre Mattiussi, Facestasm and Saint Laurent, while Namacheko, Kenzo, Sankuanz and Balmain went for dressier options with sequined, printed, draped or brilliantly coloured/contoured jackets.

 Hot Knot

Hot Knot

The art of knotting is back, and it is more versatile than ever. The biggest instance of the trend were long coats in light fabrics such as gabardine, plaid cotton and satin, followed by the classic knotted necks in multiple variations, from heavy scarf necks by Fumito Ganryu and Lanvin to cape style ones by Palomo Spain.

Louis Vuitton went offbeat by juxtaposing multiple single tape knotted trims over their necks and waistlines, while Loewe, Saint Laurent and Alyx went for plunge neck topwear ending with knotted waists.

Satin Sensation

Satin Sensation

The material trends for womenswear predicted satin as a microtrend but the menswear collections transformed the opulent fabric into one of the biggest trends on the S/S’20 radar. Manipulated using multiple techniques, satin constructed head-to-toe outfits for many lines.

Street met chic at Balmain where quilted satin puffer jackets made an appearance, Bode used heavy metal embellishment and intricate embroidery for its folk-inspired satin coats, and others such as Dior Homme and Sies Marjan showcased asymmetrical coordinated sets in light pink and electric blue hues. 

Pastel Paradigm

Pastel Paradigm

Paris Men’s Fashion Week was a pastel dream come true, balancing subtle soft hues and slams of sorbet with specks of black, red or the prints here and there. Different shades of four standout colours that included Serenity Blue, Peach, Aquamarine and Baby Pink were styled in multiple ways.

Amiri and Berluti championed pistachio and sea green for their tailored suit sets, blue in pastel and sorbet rained over Fashion East, Acne Studios, Alyx, Balmain and Louis Vuitton and showcasing the feminine side were Craig Green and Kenzo with their sheer, satin and poplin pastel garments, while Jacquemus went all out by producing 3-piece sets encompassing different hues of the trend.

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