Zac Posen, GE Additive and Protolabs collaborate to unveil 3D printing collection at Met Gala

by Apparel Resources News-Desk

09-May-2019  |  5 mins read

3D printing collection at Met Gala
Image Courtesy: stitchworld.com

Met Gala, in New York City every year captures the attention of fashion-watchers and pop-culture enthusiasts. This year, the event managed to grab some attention of technology enthusiasts, engineering aficionados and manufacturing too.

Zan Posen, GE Additive and Protolabs have worked in collaboration to create fashion pieces featuring a range of innovative, sculptural 3D printed garments and accessories, inspired by the concept of freezing natural objects in motion. “I dreamt the collection, GE Additive helped engineer it and Protolabs printed it,” said Zac Posen.

Four gowns and a headdress featuring 3D printed elements and structures were unveiled, worn by British supermodel Jourdan Dunn, actresses Nina Dobrev, Katie Holmes, Julia Garner and Bollywood icon, Deepika Padukone.

Rose gown worn by Jourdan Dunn, featured 21 total petals, averaging 20 inches in size and weighing 1 lb. The petals fastened in place by a modular cage which is invisible from the outside. This dress was designed to a 3D re-creation of Jourdan’s body. The petals are made of Accura Xtreme White 200 durable plastic and printed on a stereolithography (SLA) machine.

The petals are finished with primer and colour shifting automotive paint (DuPont “Twilight Fire” Chromalusion). The cage that fastens the petals are made of Titanium (Ti-64) printed on a GE Additive Arcam EBM machine. The printing and finish of the rose gown took over 1,100 hours and was printed at Protolabs’ 3D printing facility in North Carolina, one of the largest in the world.

Bustier worn by Nina Dobrev wore was a clear printed dress with 4-piece assembly for custom fit. The interior designed to perfectly match Nina Dobrev’s 3D re-creation. The bustier is made of Somos Watershed XC 11122 plastic and printed on an SLA machine. It is finished by wet hand sanding and sprayed with a clear coat to give it a glass appearance. The printing and finish of the bustier took over 200 hours and was printed at Protolabs’ 3D printing facility in Germany.

Protolabs palm leaf collar accessory worn by Katie Holmes, draped over the shoulders and attached to the gown at the neckline. The palm leaves are made of Accura 60 plastic and printed on an SLA machine. The structure is finished with pearlescent purple paint (Pantone 8104C) and holds the custom Zac Posen water coloured tulle gown at the clavicle. The printing and finish of the palm leaves took over 56 hours and was printed at Protolabs in North Carolina.

Julia Garner wore a custom Zac Posen ombré silver to gold lamé gown with a Zac Posen x GE Additive x Protolabs headpiece. The intricate printed vine headpiece with leaf and berry embellishments is printed as a single piece and made of Nylon 12 plastic and printed on a Multi Jet Fusion (MJF) machine. The headpiece is finished by brass plating. The printing and finish of the headdress took over 22 hours and was printed at Protolabs in North Carolina.

Deepika Padukone wore a custom Zac Posen metallic pink lurex jacquard gown. This gown includes Zac Posen x GE Additive x Protolabs embroidery which have been sewn on. The embroidery is made of Accura 5530 plastic and printed on an SLA machine. The embroidery is vacuum metalised, and centre painted with Pantone 8081C. These 408 delicately printed embroidery pieces are attached to the outside of the custom gown. The printing and finish of the embroideries took over 160 hours and was printed at Protolabs in North Carolina.

3d Printing offers unique capabilities, such as near-complete design freedom, enabling the manufacture of designs that would have been difficult to achieve using other traditional methods of fashion design. Majority of these garments were manufactured at Protolabs’ US additive manufacturing facility near Raleigh, North Carolina, while the bustier was made in Protolabs’ Feldkirchen, Germany facility. The titanium cage for the rose gown, which provides the structure on which the petals attach, was printed at the GE Additive Technology Center in Cincinnati.

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