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Commerce Minister unveils digital mapping of Dhaka-based garment factories

by Apparel Resources News-Desk

12-February-2019  |  2 mins read

Digital Mapping
Image Courtesy: bdnews24.com

In a major move that would enable accessing relevant information of all export-oriented readymade garment factories situated in the Dhaka district digitally, Bangladesh Commerce Minister Tipu Munshi unveiled the digital database titled ‘Mapped in Bangladesh’ at Bangladesh Garment Manufacturers and Exporters Association (BGMEA) Apparel Club recently.

“The Government, city planners and civil society organisations can utilise this map’s industry dispersion and concentration date. The industry can also use the tool to showcase its capability and enable greater efficiency,” stated Project Manager for Mapped in Bangladesh Syed Hasibuddin Hussain adding that the full-fledged version of the map will be of much benefit to stakeholders across the country.

An expanded map, incorporating factories across the countries is set to be launched in 2021, maintained Hussain. The final version will incorporate data on garment factories and other enterprises throughout the country.

It may be mentioned here that the beta version of the map containing essential data on BGMEA and BKMEA listed RMG factories throughout Dhaka including factory names, GPS locations, number of workers, products, brands and buyers, etc., has been developed by the BRAC University with support from BRAC USA.

The initiative has been funded by C&A Foundation.

Speaking at the event, Munshi reportedly underlined that the online map represents another step towards ‘Digital Bangladesh’.

“The media tends to focus on even the slightest of problems faced by the four million-strong workers in the garment industry. But other prospects and possibilities in this sector are often overlooked,” reportedly stated Bangladesh Commerce Minister Tipu Munshi, adding, “Factories face a 25 to 30 per cent rise in the costs of production after the increase in minimum wages. But this issue doesn’t come up for discussion.”